Pruzzels
mostly original pruzzels from the pruault.
Pruzzels
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Locke and Roll
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beeritual:

Ballast Point “Indra Kunindra”
88 B+


This seasonal foreign/export-style stout is incredibly unique, designed for the more adventurous of drinkers. It has its roots as a collaboration with a local San Diego home brewer. This particular style is known for its heavy roasted flavors, typically bringing in slightly more alcohol than the average stout, and so additional hopping follows suit. The unusual thing about this beer is the ingredients…Madras curry, cumin, cayenne, coconut, and Kaffir lime leaf! As you might imagine, the resulting aromas are novel and delightful. Curry comes through with abundance, coconut second, vanilla, cumin, brown sugar, hints of spicy cayenne, and port wine.
On the palate, spices immediately jump in with curry leading the way, followed by cumin. Malt flavors suggest a sweetness akin to caramel blended together with dark chocolate. Midway, coconut has a noticeable influence, followed by a touch of vanilla. Hops make a soft-handed sweep of herbal flavors accented by the right amount of bitter and sour to keep with the vibe of the beer. A cayenne spice begins to rise up near the finish, carrying a surprising degree of heat that lingers alongside some residual hop oils. The Kaffir lime leaf finally touches down, dancing with the coconut, curry, cayenne, and cocoa powder in a complementary way. The lime flavor also goes particularly well with the herb-toned hops. Mouthfeel is smooth, grows increasingly dry, climaxes a little crisp, then finishes a little chalky. Cayenne heat builds in the back of the throat from sip-to-sip, which hinders drinkability, but adds yet another dimension to this busy arrangement of flavor.
The main flavor components are taken from Indian cuisine, which is why this actually works. I It’s a little surprising just how well each ingredient slowly appears in sequence. I sort of wish they had just committed to a double stout instead, because I feel more sweet malt and greater emphasis on the roast would add needed depth. Considering the complexity of ingredients, Ballast Point has pulled this off considerably well. Though I myself like it, I can’t recommend it, because I know only a select audience would really be into it. If you like Indian food you’ll be much more likely to enjoy this. For those with the courage to indulge in these exotic herbs and spices in the context of a stout, I commend you.
7.0%
50 IBU
San Diego, California
beeritual:

Ballast Point “Indra Kunindra”
88 B+


This seasonal foreign/export-style stout is incredibly unique, designed for the more adventurous of drinkers. It has its roots as a collaboration with a local San Diego home brewer. This particular style is known for its heavy roasted flavors, typically bringing in slightly more alcohol than the average stout, and so additional hopping follows suit. The unusual thing about this beer is the ingredients…Madras curry, cumin, cayenne, coconut, and Kaffir lime leaf! As you might imagine, the resulting aromas are novel and delightful. Curry comes through with abundance, coconut second, vanilla, cumin, brown sugar, hints of spicy cayenne, and port wine.
On the palate, spices immediately jump in with curry leading the way, followed by cumin. Malt flavors suggest a sweetness akin to caramel blended together with dark chocolate. Midway, coconut has a noticeable influence, followed by a touch of vanilla. Hops make a soft-handed sweep of herbal flavors accented by the right amount of bitter and sour to keep with the vibe of the beer. A cayenne spice begins to rise up near the finish, carrying a surprising degree of heat that lingers alongside some residual hop oils. The Kaffir lime leaf finally touches down, dancing with the coconut, curry, cayenne, and cocoa powder in a complementary way. The lime flavor also goes particularly well with the herb-toned hops. Mouthfeel is smooth, grows increasingly dry, climaxes a little crisp, then finishes a little chalky. Cayenne heat builds in the back of the throat from sip-to-sip, which hinders drinkability, but adds yet another dimension to this busy arrangement of flavor.
The main flavor components are taken from Indian cuisine, which is why this actually works. I It’s a little surprising just how well each ingredient slowly appears in sequence. I sort of wish they had just committed to a double stout instead, because I feel more sweet malt and greater emphasis on the roast would add needed depth. Considering the complexity of ingredients, Ballast Point has pulled this off considerably well. Though I myself like it, I can’t recommend it, because I know only a select audience would really be into it. If you like Indian food you’ll be much more likely to enjoy this. For those with the courage to indulge in these exotic herbs and spices in the context of a stout, I commend you.
7.0%
50 IBU
San Diego, California
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beeritual:

Prairie / Evil Twin “Bible Belt”
98 A+


This limited-release Imperial Stout was brewed in collaboration with Evil Twin. They’ve working with “Even More Jesus” as a base, then spice it like Prairie’s “Bomb” with real coffee, cacao nibs, vanilla, and chili pepper. These selections are two of the best each brewery has to offer, so the concept of combining them sounds just like bliss. On the nose, you’ll find loads of espresso, dark roasted malts, chocolate cake, cocoa, vanilla, oatmeal, molasses, smoke, and black pepper.
First off, let’s get one thing straight, this beer is all about the malts. The palate begins with an immense amount of dark chocolate. Coffee slowly builds to become the main focal point of the brew. Chalky cacao nibs come in full force, blending together with an agreeable bitterness. Flavors like oatmeal cookies and walnut brownies fill in the gaps along the way. A quick strike of chili pepper wraps things with a kiss of spice. Post-finish, molasses tilts the balance beam, resulting in perfect equilibrium where sweetness takes the lead. A sour hint closes with a soft character hinting at dark fruits. Hops appear almost exclusively bitter, nearly devoid of intrusive flavors which may have detracted from the stubborn malts. Mouthfeel is wet, ultra-thick and chewy, with just enough carbonation to slightly uplift the body, departing with subtle pepper heat that settles on the back of the throat.
Think of it as a fermented mocha with a spicy twist. All ingredients have their delicious moment in the timeline. The only thing keeping me from buying more is the high price of $9 /12 oz. (or about $35 / 4-pack). If you leverage the high ABV, plus the large amount of ingredients it probably took to brew this beast, this number will appear more fair. It’s actually a bit better than the original Bomb, previously reviewed here. I get the impression someone spent their time making this special. How could this get any better? It’s good to the last drop. I highly recommend it!
13.0%
65 IBU
Krebs, Oklahoma
beeritual:

Prairie / Evil Twin “Bible Belt”
98 A+


This limited-release Imperial Stout was brewed in collaboration with Evil Twin. They’ve working with “Even More Jesus” as a base, then spice it like Prairie’s “Bomb” with real coffee, cacao nibs, vanilla, and chili pepper. These selections are two of the best each brewery has to offer, so the concept of combining them sounds just like bliss. On the nose, you’ll find loads of espresso, dark roasted malts, chocolate cake, cocoa, vanilla, oatmeal, molasses, smoke, and black pepper.
First off, let’s get one thing straight, this beer is all about the malts. The palate begins with an immense amount of dark chocolate. Coffee slowly builds to become the main focal point of the brew. Chalky cacao nibs come in full force, blending together with an agreeable bitterness. Flavors like oatmeal cookies and walnut brownies fill in the gaps along the way. A quick strike of chili pepper wraps things with a kiss of spice. Post-finish, molasses tilts the balance beam, resulting in perfect equilibrium where sweetness takes the lead. A sour hint closes with a soft character hinting at dark fruits. Hops appear almost exclusively bitter, nearly devoid of intrusive flavors which may have detracted from the stubborn malts. Mouthfeel is wet, ultra-thick and chewy, with just enough carbonation to slightly uplift the body, departing with subtle pepper heat that settles on the back of the throat.
Think of it as a fermented mocha with a spicy twist. All ingredients have their delicious moment in the timeline. The only thing keeping me from buying more is the high price of $9 /12 oz. (or about $35 / 4-pack). If you leverage the high ABV, plus the large amount of ingredients it probably took to brew this beast, this number will appear more fair. It’s actually a bit better than the original Bomb, previously reviewed here. I get the impression someone spent their time making this special. How could this get any better? It’s good to the last drop. I highly recommend it!
13.0%
65 IBU
Krebs, Oklahoma
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binghamtonbeer:

Hill Farmstead E. - According to the label E. is for Easter.  Like a beautiful marriage of Edward and Arthur. Only slight tartness at this point, but I bet that will pick up significantly over time. Great beer.
binghamtonbeer:

Hill Farmstead E. - According to the label E. is for Easter.  Like a beautiful marriage of Edward and Arthur. Only slight tartness at this point, but I bet that will pick up significantly over time. Great beer.
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The Best Advice You’ll Ever Receive

Do you believe your thoughts? Vision Instinct Insight Hallucination Prophecy Strength of diction likely the difference between pure movement and a clamshell More at 11. for Ernest Becker
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talkbacker:

Review: Nightcrawler Vol. 2 #1
Nightcrawler Volume 2 is the new ongoing series devoted to the teleporting mutant following his resurrection. It’s written by Chris Claremont and drawn by Todd Nauck. At what point does a reviewer stop being influenced in his reviews by the shadow of what an artist has done before? That is…
See more about it over here.
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postmoderncorruption:

Licking Things To Claim Them As Your Own
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mowhawk-drumhead:

this never gets old